What We Know About Velvet Deer Antler

Dr. Robert Morse, N.D., D.Sc., M.H.Mar 11, '1525 comments

Velvet antler is the early growth portion of an antler.  Unlike sheep, cow and elephants who have one set of horns/tusks  for life, animals such as moose, elk and deer shed their antlers and regrow them every year.  Velvet antler is harvested by simply cutting off the antler at an earlier stage than it would naturally fall off.

Elk and deer are raised in protected environments and are fed well.  This process is not harmful in any way to these domesticated, loving vegetarians.  Harvesting velvet deer antler is, to the animal, the equivalent of having your fingernails cut.  It is beneficial to the animals as it minimizes the risk of injury when males combat each other.  The deer are also given a mild anesthetic to minimize the stress, much as some veterinarians will do to dogs and cats when trimming their nails.

The Ultimate Immune tonic, which contains velvet deer antler, is a cellular tonic especially for those who are feeble, emaciated, or broken down.  It is said that velvet deer antler is especially good for the bone marrow and helps strengthen the body.  Because it is a cellular proliferator, it can also help speed the healing of wounds.  NFL (National Football League) players use velvet antler to build strength and endurance and speed the healing of injuries.

Some worry that animals are harmed in this process.  We have not directly heard of any cases.  However, that does not stop others from wild harvesting, and in this sense some things can become a catch 22.  Our herb company receives their velvet deer antler from sources where deer are protected and raised with utmost care.  The benefits of velvet deer antler greatly outweigh the miniscule amount of negative, especially for practitioners in their tremendous task today of getting people well and rebuilding the human cell.

Comments (25)

DISGUSTING & SHAMEFUL on Mar 14, '15

DISGUSTING & SHAMEFUL all for the sake of money.

Anne J DeRocher, CN on Mar 14, '15

I have used God’s herbs for years now. They are great. I have to say though, nothing about using deer antler feels right. We are not supposed to hold deers captive and cut off their antlers prematurely. I completely oppose this and hope you choose an alternative.

Jacki Vorhees on Mar 13, '15

This ingredient/process makes me very sad. I am a wildlife major and am fully aware of what’s going on with this process. I do believe you when you say the deer are taken care of and I am glad they are given an anesthetic but, I would like to see this ingredient tightly controlled by Dr. Morse. By that I mean not for sale to the general public – only given to people who have had a consultation and it is deemed absolutely necessary for the health/life of this individual. Love you Dr. Morse & Staff

NotOK on Mar 13, '15

Which formulas contain this hidden deer antler? As a vegan I will never consume $hit like this. Ridiculous. Morse you know better.

danny glass on Mar 13, '15

I have now lost total respect for you due to seller deer antler.. There is no need for this to be sold as we can get everything we need from plant based foods.. Do you have no compassion for the deers? This is painful and traumatic for the deer..

Carl Mulder on Mar 13, '15

Great blog, thanks for the update.

Anne J DeRocher, CN on Mar 12, '15

I have used God’s herbs for years now. They are great. I have to say though, nothing about using deer antler feels right. We are not supposed to hold deers captive and cut off their antlers prematurely. I completely oppose this and hope you choose an alternative.

Amy on Mar 12, '15

Where to start…. deer are not domesticated animals as suggested in the article… nor is it ethical to keep them in captivity just to sedate and clamp the deer to remove their antlers. Many deer farms also harvest the animals for meat and there have been multiple examples of cruelty in this practice, so it is unusual that the clinic has never heard examples of this. There may not be nerves in the antlers, but there are many at the base which probably do not respond well to the actions of a saw. Fingernails also do not bleed when cut like the deer antlers. Perhaps the clinic could find a vegan alternative or leave it out all together? Is this really necessary or appropriate in the fruitarian community which is typically populated with vegans?

Melissa on Mar 12, '15

I am EXTREMELY disappointed in this. I can’t even express it properly. Just don’t.

rose on Mar 12, '15

I hope Dr. Morse doesn’t approve of this. I will not take any medicine that comes from doing this. Love you Dr. Morse. Smile and be happy.

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